Case smelt like a failed coup d’etat

Case smelt like a failed coup d’etat

WHEN Prime Minister Thabane and his current wife, ’Maesaiah Thabane, were accused of murder and appeared in court last month, I for one thought justice was finally being served in the Lipolelo Thabane murder case. We had waited long enough to see the two in court and seeing them there felt so sweet.
However, recent events have punctured my confidence in Lesotho’s justice system. Thato Sibolla, a key witness in the murder case, has since fled the country fearing for her safety. Although she is a key witness, the Lesotho Mounted Police Service (LMPS) leadership, under Commissioner Holomo Molibeli, dismally failed to protect her.
And she fled.

If the police were serious about these arrests, they would have done everything in their power to protect that only survivor. I have since concluded that these arrests were only part of a scheme to oust Thabane from power, and nothing else. Believe me, I want justice to be done for Lipolelo Thabane.
But this does not smell like justice, the aroma of these arrests smells like a failed coup d’état. They were hoping Thabane would be intimidated by these charges and force him to resign. They were almost successful because Thabane made a series of statements where he announced that he had intentions to step down or retire.

Who is responsible for the selection of people to be targeted in this manner? Who directs these activities and controls the operations subsequently? Who undertakes the actual character assassination? Why are such individuals selected now after two years yet Commissioner Holomo has always known that these people were engaged in criminal behaviour or had committed crimes since he took the oath of office?
If for the past two years Commissioner Holomo was controlled by the Prime Minister, it explains why Lipolelo Thabane murder case was left unattended for two years. What changed so quickly? Who is now controlling Commissioner Holomo? If we are to take the LMPS seriously, we were supposed to see wholesale arrests including those of the police who are still in service today.

Conveniently, the LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Thelingoane ‘Mota, who was brutally shot and killed by known police officers at Korokoro on the outskirts of Maseru. When his corpse was found the head was ripped open and the brain was missing. No police officer has been arrested to date.
The LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Kamoheli ‘Matli, a young Mosotho man who was brutally tortured to death by known police officers in Botha-Bothe district in the north eastern part of Lesotho. The police officers have not been arrested to date.

Expediently, the LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Mosiuoe Raleababa, a seventy year-old Mosotho man who was brutally tortured to death by known police officers in Maputsoe in the district of Leribe, in the north eastern part of Lesotho. The police officers have not been arrested to date.
Fittingly, the LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Selebalo Maama, a young Mosotho man who was shot and killed by known police officers in the vicinity of the Maseru City. The police officer has not been arrested to date.

Pertinently, the LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Tenene Pitae, a Mosotho man who was shot and killed by known police officers at Kao mining area in the district of Botha Bothe. The police officers have not been arrested to date.
The LMPS might have forgotten, but allow me to remind them of Thabang Maqekoane, a young Mosotho man who was shot and killed execution-style by known police officers at Pitseng in the District of Leribe. The police officers have not been arrested to date.

Thabang Mohlakoana, Lebohang Moleleki, Tšepo Lekota, Tau Khauoe, Mahao Motiki, Lepota Moroba, Retšepile Moeletsi, Potsane Mohale, Mokhachane Lechesa are among the 60 Basotho citizens who have been killed in the last three years.
On January 3, 2020, Thabane suspended Commissioner Molibeli. On January 6, Thabane appointed Sera Makharilele to act for a day. The army had to be called to quell tensions after Commissioner Molibeli forced himself into office with armed bodyguards and pointed guns at the Acting Commissioner Makharilele and his bodyguards at the LMPS headquarters.

Please tell Commissioner Holomo that an open rebellion against proper authority is called mutiny. When is the LMPS going to hold him accountable? He should be charged with sedition and mutiny.

But I know it is not going to happen because everything that is happening was part of the plan, his arrest is not part of the mission. Therefore, I have concluded these are targeted persecutions meant to destabilise the government and force the Prime Minister to resign.
I want the Prime Minister to resign yesterday, but I cannot be fooled by these political machinations.

The timing of these arrests, makes it all the more obvious that these are politically motivated arrests. The evidence Commissioner Holomo has today is the same evidence he had when he started serving as commissioner. That is why I have concluded that it is political persecution.
Thabane and ’Maesaiah should have their day in court if they have to answer for anything but not because elements in Thabane’s cabinet want to topple him. They must leave judicial and law enforcement systems alone as their goal is to be independent.

By: Ramahooana matlosa

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