A little too late

A little too late

THABA-BOSIU – THE law regulating initiation schools should be on board by the end of the year.
But for the Ramontšuoe family located at Ha-Ramontšuoe atop Berea Plateau, the law will come too late.
In 2013 their Chief Letela Malisa Ramontšuoe was seized from a bar by hooligans who were his subjects and force-marched him to an initiation school.

The chief had refused to go to the initiation school. Some of his subjects were furious. They refused to be ruled by someone they culturally considered “a boy” so they forcibly grabbed him.

Along the way they battered him with fighting sticks until he died.
The police then said the mob had frog-marched him to a school in a nearby village of Masaleng in Thaba-Bosiu.
By the time they arrived at the initiation school, Ramontšuoe had bruises all over his body.

His ribs had been broken, according to his younger brother Ramonne Malisa.
The school owner refused to accept his dead body and arrested his assailants with the help of people in the village.

Nkheli Liphoto

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