For NUL  students,  dirt is good!

For NUL students, dirt is good!

ROMA – THE National University of Lesotho (NUL) students, graduates and their friends take waste and make marvels out of it!
They use discarded wood, old tires, even old cassettes to make new and awesome products. Any living soul cannot help but marvel at the fabulous chairs from waste tires, a stove from car wheel rims, furniture from old abandoned wood, and a wallet from an old cassette. Their company which is called Nabulart Recycling was formed in 2014. It was formed by a team of ten young innovators, says Theletsa Mpholle, a fifth year Chemical Technology student at the NUL.  Ever since then, they have stuck together like they are bonded by superglue. And they work miracles together. Here is the unbeatable team: ‘Mathobatsi Sekoere, Theletsa Mpholle, Hape Matsepe, and Masupha Makhetha, all NUL graduates or students. The others are Makara Marekimane, Bataung Madane, Mojabeng Moholo, Moipone Mohloai, Lehlohonolo Phasumane and Morakane Semoko are graduates or students from Fokothi, UCT and other tertiary institutions.

The company is named after Nebular Orion, where, according to their view, “old worn out stars are recycled into new ones,” deep in the universe.
When the fresh minds sat down together back in 2014, they were not sure what they specifically wanted to do.  But something was unmistakable. They wanted to make a difference, a big difference. “We wanted to grab the bull of unemployment by its horn,” Mpholle says. “And we wanted to do that in the most responsible way possible!”
One day, one of them, by the name Madane, saw one documentary that was to change the team’s goals forever! It was a documentary on the works of EarthshipBiotecture Academy in New Mexico in the US.

The organisation used all kinds of waste such as bottles, old tires and so on to make many amazing products. Madane shared the documentary with the group and, oops! A new zeal was kindled! It was a zeal that would survive to this day. Educated minds themselves, they planned their adventure into three phases.  In phase 1, they hoped to reshape and reuse old materials, and educate the nation about the tenets of sustainable development. They are deep in that phase, and the products they have made bear witness; they have even visited schools like ‘Mabathoana and Lesotho HS, sharing the massage. Think about the following products:

Who still remember an obsolete device called cassette which was popular as late as the early 2000’s? So you thought it was gone forever! You would have been right, were it not due to the presence of the Naburlart Recyclers amongst us. So they reshape the device and use it to store money. We are not kidding! An old cassette is now a wallet! True, it can’t give you music anymore, but it CAN store your money safely. What about those old tires many love to burn for heat in Winter? Hold on, burning them is one of the most dangerous thing you can do! It releases obnoxious mix of toxic fumes that will take a chunk out of your life years!

Lo and behold, the Neburlart recyclers are using them for a more useful and healthy function. They make magnificent furniture out of them. For you the lovers of wine, how about that wooden wine bottle and glass holder—all from an old wood? The very sight of that beautiful device will make you thirsty. Lastly, what if you have joined the ranks of the lovers of meat; we mean those guys who proudly live to eat!  The Neburlart Recyclers haven’t forgotten you either. They have used an old car rim to make…guess what, paola! Yes you can grill your meat to a delicious taste, right over there! It is no wonder then that the mighty recyclers have caught the eyes of the numerous lovers of quality around the country and beyond.
Their products are rented in many events all over the country. For instance, the brilliant and legendary monthly Nala Project often works with them. The Recyclers’ stage made of old wood has been used in the opening ceremony of the Vodacom Superstar Competition. Lest you forget, that was just phase 1. They have other dreams too!
Phase 2 of their dreams is about getting into the realm of farming.  They want to take a different route altogether in this one. Instead of using traditional water-wasting irrigation methods, they are eyeing a frugal drip irrigation.  “We want to use less to get more by being smart in farming,” Mpholle said.

The planned Phase 3 shows they think big . . . but start small! In this one, they want to get into “building radically sustainable homes.” The homes will be energy efficient and some will be based on waste. Now they are planning to take just two of the team members for a trip to the US to learn more about these issues. They just need air tickets; everything is catered for once they are there.

Own Correspondent

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