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Embrace reconciliation

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EUROPEAN Union (EU) ambassador to Lesotho, Christian Manahl, spoke passionately last week about the need for forgiveness and true reconciliation for Basotho. The two qualities of forgiveness and reconciliation could be crucial if Lesotho is to move away from decades of conflict and strife. Ambassador Manahl said “no political system can be stable without justice”.

“But justice requires careful judgment. Sometimes retribution causes or perpetuates divisions, and it is forgiveness and magnanimity that unifies a society and a nation.”Those are wise words indeed. The reality on the ground is that despite our heavy Christian ethos, we remain a deeply divided society. We are also a very vindictive society that is bent on revenge. We do not forgive easily.
That is why we have not forgotten who was on which side when violence erupted after the 1970 general election. The deep scars from that dark period of our history have remained unhealed, four decades later.

Yet, we would like to believe that Ambassador Manahl was not asking for the impossible. We can overcome our differences and forge a common future marked by genuine reconciliation and forgiveness. Deputy Prime Minister Monyane Moleleki, who has had the privilege of observing Lesotho’s politics from a vantage point for decades, also appealed to Basotho to embrace the spirit of forgiveness.

Unless we embrace forgiveness, we run the risk of falling into a cycle of endless violence. Today’s victim will be tomorrow’s tormentor. We do not believe that is the right approach. As Lesotho prepares for the all-stakeholders conference next month, it is crucial that the political leadership embraces the spirit of forgiveness and reconciliation. That is not a daft request.

There must be an immediate cessation of hostilities. The victors in the last election in June must be magnanimous in victory and push for true national dialogue and reconciliation. For dialogue to prosper, we need the right political environment that is not marked by confrontation and animosity. The government led by Prime Minister Thomas Thabane must create such an enabling environment.

Unless such an environment is created, the SADC-driven reforms will be dead in the water. That would be tragic for Lesotho. The government says it needs every Mosotho in the country to participate fully in the crafting of a shared vision for Lesotho. It is fully cognisant that it cannot proceed with the reforms without the opposition playing ball.

That is why we must commend the government for dispatching a high powered delegation to South Africa last week to persuade the three exiled opposition leaders to return home.  The opposition must resist the temptation to adopt a hardliner stance. On its part the government must reassure the opposition leaders that they will not be harmed if they return home.

It must also demonstrate that it is committed to the process of dialogue by acceding to former deputy Prime Minister Mothetjoa Metsing’s request to be paid his monthly allowance, unless if there are compelling reasons not to do so. Not so long ago, senior figures making up the current government were in exile themselves. An attempt by the Pakalitha Mosisili-led administration to plod on with the reform process stalled precisely because it could not coax Thabane and his allies who were in exile to participate in the process. The lesson is clear for Lesotho: We need everybody on board if we are to have meaningful dialogue on the way forward.

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Stop the leaks

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IN our last week’s issue of thepost, we reported on a story of how the Examinations Council of Lesotho (ECOL) had withheld results of six schools following the leaking of examination papers.
The leaking of the examination papers is not just a criminal matter involving teachers and school principals. It goes to the very heart of our entire school system in Lesotho.

The implications for students and the education system are therefore huge. Once the integrity of our examination system is questioned, we risk ruining the future of thousands of students who might want to further their studies outside Lesotho’s borders.

Our universities and technical colleges might also end up recruiting students who do not necessarily deserve to be there. That would be disastrous.
It is precisely for these reasons that the police must get to the bottom of this embarrassing scandal. It is no small matter.

The police must channel enough resources to weed out the culprits and drag them before courts of law. Anything short of this would have serious implications for future generations.

The cost of failing to act against the culprits will be huge, in the long run.
We are shocked that teachers and some school principals were so brazen in their violation of the law when they leaked the examination papers.

They did not just allow the students to access the question papers way before the exams. But they went on and directly “coached” their students on how to answer certain questions.

At one school, we are told, students all had uniform responses to exam questions. What this scandal has proved is that the Examinations Council of Lesotho has a serious problem on its hands.
It will need to come up with a new, radical approach to stop the rot, or we will have to kiss the integrity of our exams goodbye.

Sadly, this is not the first time that we have reported about examination papers leaking in Lesotho. It has been a perennial problem that has been happening for years.
The tragedy is that the examinations authority has still not come up with a workable system to stop the leaks and effectively punish offenders. This is why we still have this problem bobbling around every year during exam times.

The big question we must all grapple with is: So what must be done?
ECOL, as the technocrats, must come up with fresh ideas to stop the rot.

Perhaps, what is happening in the education sector is a confirmation that we recruited the wrong people to manage and run our schools. We need men and women of integrity to run the system.

If any are identified as bad apples, by leaking exams, the Ministry of Education must be extremely ruthless at expelling such teachers and principals. That is because they would have sold their soul on the altar of expediency.

We need a new policy that weeds out offenders. That policy must be applied without mercy. Only when the ministry has punished offenders appropriately will we be able to see a stop to this madness.

The days of treating teachers and school principals with kid gloves should be over.

The leaking of exam papers is a criminal matter. It must be treated as such. Once the government takes the matter from that angle, then we will see a much more aggressive and serious attempt to stop the leaks.

 

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Tough times ahead for Lesotho

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ELSEWHERE in this issue, we carry a story of the rising and desperate levels of poverty in urban areas after thousands of factory workers were emptied on the streets in the last year or two.
We are aware that the textile sector has been in the doldrums for years. That crisis was worsened following the devastating Covid-19 pandemic between 2020 and 2022.

After decades of economic mismanagement, we are beginning to reap the bitter results of a spectacular failure to diversify our economy.
And so when the textile sector catches a cold, the whole economy falls into a tailspin. With no other solid sectors to stabilise the economy, we are in serious trouble as a country.

The textile sector, with about 35 000 workers, was the second biggest employer after the civil service. That sector, unfortunately now lies in ruins.
Over the last two years, we have watched helplessly as it suffered a devastating bloodbath with thousands of jobs being lost.
That was initially due to a drop in orders from the United States.

In a bid to stay afloat, the textile companies began resorting to laying off workers. The bloodbath has not stopped. More workers continue to be thrown onto the jobless heap.
Without jobs, people can no longer provide the basics for their families. The levels of poverty and desperation have suddenly increased.
But it is not just the factory workers who have been badly hit. Those who relied on the factory workers downstream have been hit too.

Think of the hundreds of landlords in Ha-Tsolo, next to the textile factories in Thetsane. As reported in this issue, the retrenched workers have since abandoned their rented apartments. Some have reportedly sought better opportunities in South Africa while others have gone back to their rural areas.

Without any steady income coming from the rentals, the landlords in Ha-Tsolo who housed textile workers, are in deep trouble. They too were relying on textile workers to eke a living. Now the goose that lay the golden eggs is no more.

Lesotho has a large segment of informal workers. Some of these make a living by selling foodstuffs on the streets in “open kitchens” by the roadside on in their car boots.
These hawkers are now on their knees.

All this points to a real crisis for Lesotho.
If there is anything that will pose a threat to social order in Lesotho, it is the desperate levels to which people are being subjected to. Without jobs, without a basic income to cushion them from poverty, we are likely to see an explosion of anger on the streets.

That is a scary scenario.
Prime Minister Sam Matekane is in an unenviable position as leader. Two years after his rise to the premiership, he must begin to think, fast, how his government can ameliorate this crisis.

Doing nothing cannot be an option. Neither is pointing fingers at previous regimes as the author of our misery. The people think it is him who is in power and he must sort this out.
The time of apportioning blame is over. The people are no longer interested in who caused the problem. All they want is a solution.

While the people were talking of Matekane in “messianic” terms, the reality is that the Prime Minister is no messiah. He is a man of flesh and blood just like all of us.
What he really needs is a team of technocrats to back up his vision with real action on the ground in pushing his transformation agenda.
Only then can his government begin creating the jobs that Basotho desperately need.

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The clock is ticking

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It’s been months since the passport crisis started and the government doesn’t seem to be anywhere near solving it. Instead, we have different explanations that come across as contrived excuses.
Last year, the Ministry of Home Affairs blamed the crisis on the Russia-Ukraine war which it said had affected the supply of chips required to produce e-passports.

This time the ministry says the delay is due to a clearing agency holding on to a batch of passports in South Africa.
Granted, all those explanations could have been correct at the particular times. True, the delay could be a combination of both. The shortage of chips could have created a backlog that was then worsened by the delay at the clearing agency.

Yet the trouble is that the government doesn’t fully explain why there is a delay at the clearing agency or whether the chips are now readily available.
Because the government appears to be economical with the details, the public is left to speculate out of frustration.
To calm and assure the public the government has to forthrightly answer the following questions: Why is the agent holding on to the passports?

Could it be because the agent is holding the passports over a current or previous debt? How many passports does the agent have now?
What is the government doing to expedite the delivery of the passports from Johannesburg?
And finally, when does it expect to solve this crisis once and for all?

As long as those questions remain unanswered, the ministry and the government will continue to be pilloried and accused of making false promises.
Whatever the problem, the government should deal with it. No amount of explanation or excuses will help the thousands of desperate Basotho stuck because they don’t have passports.

The backlog of passports was 42 000 at the last count but continues to rise because the government keeps accepting new applications.
We need not remind the government that the livelihoods and education of thousands of Basotho depend on passports. We believe it’s a fundamental right.
What makes the explanation for the crisis appear hollow is the fact passports are not the only basic good the government has consistently and dismally failed to deliver.
There are no number plates and drivers’ licences. The supply of basic medicines to public hospitals and clinics has been patchy for years. Police and chiefs don’t have stationery.

Livestock owners are not getting ownership documents. The shortage of basic livestock medication is perennial. Schools don’t get textbooks on time and sometimes students go for a whole year without them. Given this reality, it is not surprising that some, including this newspaper, are not fully convinced by the government’s explanation for the delay in passports.

It doesn’t appear that this is due to a hiccup. Rather, it could be systemic. There are too many delays to too many government services and goods.
Most of those delays were inherited from the past administration but that will not mollify angry Basotho.

It was precisely because it promised to solve these persistent problems that the government was elected into power. The people have a legitimate expectation by their government will deliver on their promises. Anything short of a complete delivery will be tantamount to betrayal.

The public’s frustration is building up and it might be only a matter of time before the people completely lose confidence in the government.
It would be tragic were the government to lose the massive goodwill it still enjoys merely because it would failed to resolve a key issue such as that of passports.
The clock is ticking.

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