Connect with us

News

Matekane piles pressure on parastatals

Published

on

MASERU – PRIME Minister Sam Matekane is cranking up the pressure on under-performing government parastatals.

Barely a few weeks in office, his government has demanded reports from the Water and Sewerage Company (WASCO) and the Lesotho Electricity Company (LEC).

Ministry of Energy and Meteorology Principal Secretary, ’Maseokho Sekhobe-Moholobela, has demanded answers from the LEC.

In the letter dated November 14, Sekhobe-Moholobela said they want to assess the progress made by the LEC on its activities.

The ministry has requested that the LEC should give them an organogram and all institutional framework that established the LEC and its management.

The LEC has been asked to provide the ministry with its financial statements from April 2021 to March 2022.

It has also been asked to issue its audited management matters for the past three years.

The letter also requests that the LEC should provide the Board of Directors’ sitting minutes, schedules and their requirements from April 2021 to date.

The ministry has also demanded the appointment letters of the Board of Directors, their term limits and their CVs.

It further requests that the LEC should provide its strategic plan and the list of projects in order of priority, status, and rationale theory.

The required information has to be submitted to the office of the principal secretary no later than tomorrow.

Meanwhile, the principal secretary in the Ministry of Water has also written to the WASCO requesting some information that includes the body’s financial statements for the past three years.

The principal secretary has also requested that he should be provided with the WASCO organogram and all institutional frameworks that established WASCO and its management.

“We request the audit management letter for the last three years and the WASCO strategic plan,” the letter said.

The Water Ministry has also requested the Board of Directors’ sitting minutes for the past three years, sitting schedule for the past two years and the fees paid.

It needs the Board of Directors’ term limits and their CVs.

The WASCO is expected to furnish the ministry with the list of projects in order of priority, status and rationale.

The information was to be submitted to the office of the principal secretary by the end of business yesterday.

Nkheli Liphoto

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

The high cost of school drop-outs

Published

on

MASERU – ’MATŠEPANG Sello has gone for 14 months without a salary and life is spiraling into a struggle since she lost her job at one of Lesotho’s biggest textile factories last year.

The firm, C&Y Garments, shut shop due to a Covid-19 induced economic downturn, sending home hundreds of workers because it could no longer afford to pay them. To survive, Sello does piece jobs.

“But that is hardly enough to take care of my three children,” said Sello.

Sello’s daughter dropped out of Lesia High School in Grade Eight because she couldn’t afford to pay fees for two children. Her other child is in Grade 12.

“I couldn’t afford to pay for both of them. It broke my heart to withdraw my child from school because of my financial struggles. I failed her and this broke her too as she badly wanted to go to school,” Sello said.

“It gets tough every day and she wants to go back to school next year and by the look of things, I am not sure if she will return because I am still unemployed but I am already worried about their Christmas clothes.”

As the country battles to recover from the devastation of Covid-19, many children who dropped out of school are still in dire straits, with little hope that they will return to class anytime soon. Reasons for dropping out school vary, ranging from the effects of Covid-19 to fascination with initiation schools.

’Matebello Mphoto, 67, is another heartbroken person. Her 17-year-old grandson abandoned his Grade Eight studied at Masianokeng High School in July to join initiation school.

“We fetched him twice and for the third time, he said he would go very far to ensure that we don’t reach him,” ’Matebello said.

“What he did to us was very painful as he was sponsored by Social Welfare. He ruined his chances. Hele! haeba ha ke a shoa ke high-blood (I almost died of high blood pressure),” she said.

She said her grandson succumbed to peer pressure as his friends were already out of school. Other children simply lost interest in school, leaving their parents and guardians baffled.

Motlalepula Mokhele is one such disappointed guardian. His three nephews dropped out of school saying they “don’t want school anymore”.

Mokhele said Covid-19 forced the 11, 13 and 16-year-olds to spend time on the streets following school closures in 2020.

“They said they are used to making money and that they would not waste their time with school. We tried to get them back in schools multiple times but failed as we were informed that they bunked classes,” Mokhele said.

Masianokeng High School Principal, ’Mapesha Lehohla, said the school lost close to 100 students in 2019 due to a teachers’ strike. Some dropped out because of lack of school fees while others were pregnant.

This year, 44 of the school’s 355 students did not return to school after winter recess because they could not raise the required school fees.

“Since 2019 some children lost interest in education and parents are too busy or stressed to check their children’s school progress,” Lehohla said.

She said many parents said they do not have money to pay school fees and “we end up negotiating ways of payment”.

She said fees paid by the Social Development Ministry do not cover the children’s daily educational needs.

The Principal of St James High School in Mokhotlong, ’Masetho Matalasi, said the Covid-19 outbreak had a devastating impact on children’s education.

“Many children dropped out of school, some went to Durban to seek jobs…they have lost interest in education,” said Matalasi, adding that initiation schools are also a cause of many dropouts.

“It was getting better before initiation. Yearly, we lose children to initiation school and luckily some still come back after initiation,” Matalasi said.

She said lack of school fees is another contributing factor causing students to drop out “but we try as much as we can to keep them at school”.

“We still have students who owe first quarter fees because their parents are unemployed and some even wrote their exams without paying even a cent,” she said.

“We keep them as long as they are able to pay the exam fees. We really don’t expel them,” she said, adding that “it is evident that some parents and caregivers are struggling to make ends meet”.

She said children along with their parents have to be constantly reminded about the importance of education.

However, she said delays by parents to pay fees adversely affects the operations of the school, particularly the school feeding programme.

Lesia High School Principal, Mathafeng Moteuli, who is also the Lesotho Principals Association’s president, said dropouts are a common phenomenon in schools due to lack of finances because many parents have lost their jobs.

He said many parents left their children behind while they went out of the country to seek jobs.

“This year we lost even those who were supposed to write their final examinations,” Moteuli said.

“Initiation schools made things worse for us as some of the pupils wrote just one subject and left for initiation. I really don’t understand how they make such decisions,” he said.

Moteuli said some children have lost interest in education, revealing that they had three cases of children whose parents paid exam fees but the children refused to write.

He said to retain students in schools, authorities are planning to talk to parents through counselling because “parents are going through a lot as it is”.

“We want to identify their problems and ways in which we can overcome them.”

He said they are also planning to have an exchange programme with the Lesotho Correctional Service (LCS) to raise awareness about children who end up in juvenile training centres.

St James High School (Maseru) Principal, Thato Koeete, said although the money issue is not publicly discussed, “it is a major cause to why we lose children”.

“I am wondering whether our students will return back next year now that some factories are shutting down. Parents are struggling and children are suffering,” Koeete said.

She said parents should be capacitated to start small businesses, adding that the school loses about 20 students every year.

“Most fail to return to school in the second quarter,” said Koeete.

Basic Education Principal Secretary, Dr Lira Khama, said the ministry has several strategies in place to reduce high costs of education at secondary school level.

He said the government meets parents’ half-way to provide books through the book centre scheme.

He also said vulnerable pupils receive sponsorship.

“Ours is inclusive education. Paying at secondary level affects a lot of children negatively and it is evident that our operation on its own is wrong,” Dr Khama said.

He said there are over 1 400 primary schools countrywide and only 300 secondary schools.

“It shows that there are many children who never proceed to secondary school after completing their primary,” he said.

“The question is where do they go because primary education is not enough to empower them with enough information to survive? Besides that, they are still too young and have to be enrolled in school until they finish at least secondary level,” said Dr Khama.

He said the ministry released a circular after realising that some children were expelled from school due to hyphenate of fees. The circular is to make principals and parents aware that “it is not in the best interest of a child to drop out of school because of school fees”.

He urged parents to prioritise their responsibilities, while schools should collaborate with parents to find other ways to help affected children.

“A child shouldn’t be expelled because of unpaid fees. School fees isn’t a child’s responsibility but a parent’s,” he said.

The Social Development’s Director of Planning, ’Mankhatho Linko, said the department will jointly embark on a basic education strengthening project with the Education Ministry by offering top-up grants worth M1 500.

The grants will be paid twice a year – M1 000 at the beginning of the year and M500 in the middle of the year for 9 000 students.

The grants are for orphaned and vulnerable beneficiaries in Grade Eight and Nine and will start next year.

She said the World Bank is funding the three components at a cost of US$7.5 million (approximately M129 million). These are helping children to return back to school, training teachers in schools where children underperform in Maths and science, and the formation of youth clubs.

“The majority of such children are from the mountainous regions, which indicates that they are children from poor families, who are already being helped by the ministry with Child Grants Programme.”
Social Development Principal Secretary, ’Mantšenki Mphalane, said although poverty seems to be the main factor behind school drop-outs, there are other issues causing the lack of enthusiasm for school.

“The main issue seems to be the need for work for parents, low income for parents to send children to school, child labour, and other customs and practices such as initiation schools,” Mphalane said.

Meanwhile, the 10th Parliament dissolved before the proposed Initiation Bill could be enacted into law.

During public consultations in June 2022, the MP for Teele constituency, Mothepu Mahapa, said the proposed Bill on initiation prescribes 18 years as the minimum age for initiation for both males and females.

“This is to ensure that children do not drop out of formal schools and go for initiation like what has happened in the past,” he said.

“Children should stay in schools and access quality education as stated in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4,” Mahapa, former deputy education minister, said.

’Mapule Motsopa

Continue Reading

News

Basotho migrant workers deported

Published

on

MASERU – Limpho Kanetsi was working at a factory in Newcastle, South Africa, when she heard that the police had started a special operation to arrest illegal migrant workers. She immediately went into hiding.

She said she had to sleep in an open space for days after running away from the police, afraid that even the house she rented would be raided.

“We did not have food or clean water,” she said.

The police eventually caught up with her and she left everything she had in her rented house in Newcastle.

Kanetsi was among the more than 500 Basotho who were arrested by the South African police in a crackdown against illegal migrant workers last week.

She says she cannot go back to fetch her belongings because she has now been banned from the country for five years.

“I do not even have my phone with me. I only have a few clothes,” she said.

She said her employer did not pay them the money they had worked for.

The South African authorities raided factories in Newcastle, KwaZulu-Natal, purging illegal immigrants working there including hundreds of Basotho.

Prime Minister Sam Matekane dispatched seven buses to go to Newcastle and fetch Basotho home.

They arrived on Monday, with the government spokesperson Communications Minister Nthati Moorosi promising that the buses were going back to collect those who stayed behind.

Of the 500 brought back home, 27 were rearrested at the border and taken to Ladybrand for crimes that were not yet clear.

The deportees told thepost that, as it often happens when employers avoid paying workers without proper work permits, they were arrested at a time when they were supposed to get paid.

Keketso Setipa said she left Lesotho on January 22 and went to work in Newcastle at a garments factory.

Setipa said she had been working there until last week on Tuesday when some people tipped them that the police were coming for them.

She said she tried to flee to the township where she stayed but found police cars already there looking for her and others.

“We fled and tried to hide at a place owned by one Afrikaner but they chased us away and called the police on us,” Setipa said.

She says they then decided to hide in the nearest bush without food and water.

“We were living under the rains and the sun for those days,” she said.

She complained that they slept in the open space for more than five days.

“It hurts because I did not go to South Africa to steal. I went there in search of a job for my children,” she said.

She added that she has left her belongings behind.

“I only have this small bag.”

She worries that once she goes back to South Africa to collect her important things she would be arrested again. She worked in South Africa without a work permit.

She said herdboys who found them wandering in the veldt offered them milk and “we survived on that milk”.

“We used to drink any water we found. When we found a pond of dirty water we knelt down and drank,” she said.

Another victim who declined to be named said her employer managed to hide them “but the employer forced us to work saying if we did not work we should walk out of the gates so that we could be arrested”.

“For the sake of our safety we had to work even at night,” she said.

“We left Lesotho to work not to commit crimes, but the (political) leadership in that country does not welcome us. It makes one cry.”

Lisebo Mahamo, another deportee, said the employer only paid them M150 each saying they would get their full salaries the following day.

“On the following day, we did not get our money. Instead the police arrived.”

Some of the illegal workers, she said, are still in Newcastle as they are afraid to go out of their hiding places.

The Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Limpho Tau, said the government is in talks with South Africa so that those who were arrested are brought back home.

“Where there were challenges, please forgive us, our plan was always to ensure that you arrive here at home safely,” Tau said.

“We are working on bringing back all those who are still in hiding in Newcastle,” he said.

He added that “there is no other neighbour except South Africa”.

“The free movements documents were signed, but they were never implemented.”

He said Matekane will meet Cyril Ramaphosa to discuss the matter and “the terms and conditions must be made flexible for both countries”.

He said the government is working hard to ensure that enough jobs are created in Lesotho so that Basotho are not forced to seek jobs in other countries.

Nkheli Liphoto

Continue Reading

News

‘Employer has no right to reject resignation letter’

Published

on

MASERU – NOBENDI Gugushe expected her resignation from the Ministry of Mining to be finalised. The next call from the ministry, she assumed, was for her to start processing her terminal benefits.

But instead, she found herself in a legal battle after the ministry rejected her resignation and insisted on laying disciplinary charges against her.

She filed an urgent application in the High Court to declare her resignation final and disciplinary charges that followed illegal.

Justice Tšeliso Monaphathi granted both pleas, ruling that an employer has no right to reject a worker’s resignation because that would be tantamount to forced labour. Justice Monaphathi also ruled that disciplinary proceedings after the rejection of her resignation were illegal.

He ruled that once an employee has resigned, their “employer neither has to accept it, nor refuse it”.

“The right to resign cannot be withdrawn without the employee’s consent,” Justice Monaphathi said.

“The refusal to accept a resignation could amount to a form of indentured labour. Section 9 of the Constitution of Lesotho expressly forbids forced labour,” he said.

The ministry, however, felt hard done by and appealed the ruling.

Its argument was based on the Public Service Regulations of 2008 which state that “where an officer who has been charged with breach of discipline resigns from the public service before the charge has been dealt with to finality in accordance with the . . . Disciplinary Code, the disciplinary proceedings on the charge of discipline shall continue against him or her notwithstanding the officer’s resignation”.

Last week the Court of Appeal however rejected the ministry’s appeal and agreed with Justice Monaphathi’s judgement. Gugushe was employed as a public officer in the ministry in 2009.

In May 2021 she was served with a “show cause letter” based on her alleged absenteeism from work since March of the same year.

She was given until May 14, 2021, to respond. On May 17, 2021, she requested “further particulars” to enable her to respond.

A day after responding, she received a letter informing her that her salary was being stopped with effect from June 24, 2021.

The salary was indeed stopped. Gugushe responded by submitting her resignation with immediate effect, on May 21, 2021.

In the resignation letter, she stated that she tendered her salary of one month, in lieu of the required one-month notice period.

In a letter of June 1, 2021, the Principal Secretary of the Ministry informed Gugushe that her resignation was not accepted because the resignation letter did not comply with the requirements for a valid resignation.

On June 25, 2021, Gugushe was served with a letter inviting her to a disciplinary hearing scheduled to take place on July 8, 2021.

Caswell Tlali

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending